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MB Lounge Chair from Knoll | Jefferson Group

MB Lounge Chair from Knoll

Marcel Breuer 1929 Lounge Chair

Marcel Breuer 1929 MB Lounge is part of the architect’s extensive work using tubular steel, a revolutionary material in furniture construction at the time. In a contrast to the Wassily Chair—one of Breuer’s best-known designs from the Bauhaus—the MB Lounge features a seemingly continuous, freefloating frame, simultaneously reflecting a tensile strength and straightforward elegance. The chair combines an upholstered foam cushion supported by horizontal metal springs that provide slight movement to the back, along with natural oak armrests that have a clear lacquer finish.

As a leader of the Bauhaus, Marcel Breuer used the technological advances of his day in the service of better living.

Construction and Details

  • Frame is seamless tubular steel with a polished chrome finish
  • Upholstered foam cushion is supported by horizontal metal springs
  • Armrests are natural oak with clear lacquer finish
  • Four plastic glides snap into pre-drilled holes on base of the chair
  • The KnollStudio logo and signature of Marcel Breuer are stamped into the base of the chair
Sustainable Design and Environmental Certification
  • Certified Clean Air GOLD

About Marcel Breuer

A champion of the modern movement and protégé of Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius, Marcel Breuer is equally celebrated for his achievements in architecture and furniture. Breuer was a student and subsequently a master carpenter at the Bauhaus in the early 1920s. His entire body of work, both architecture and furniture, embodies the driving Bauhaus objective to reconcile art and industry. While at the Bauhaus, Breuer revolutionized the modern interior with his tubular-steel furniture collection—inspired by bicycle construction and fabricated using the techniques of local plumbers. His first designs, including the Wassily and Cesca chairs, remain among the most identifiable icons of the modern furniture movement.

Republished from Knoll
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